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NaNoWriMo: Point of Departure

I haven’t been posting on this blog for a few weeks because:  1) Having broken the story about NHK World’s probable infiltration by space aliens I didn’t want to confuse my message and 2) I’ve been a bit busy with Inktober.  Now, however, Inktober is done, it seems that the government has suppressed my NHK story (else it would have more hits by now) and NaNoWriMo is once again upon us.  Just as I do Inktober my own way, I  have my own take on NaNoWriMo.  Most people try to write the first draft of a single 50,000 word novel.  That’s fine, but the last thing I need right now is another first draft in my editing queue.  So what I did last year—and will again this year—is to just write 50,000 words on any combination of legitimate projects.  Last year it took me three and a half weeks to get there; maybe I’ll go faster this year.

Now some of that will be for books I’m working on currently.  But one of them is the third draft of a novel, and I’ve never figured out a good word-count conversion for rewrites, and the other is a textbook that requires creating numerous figures and examples as I go, so that word-count builds pretty slowly.

So that’s where the blog comes in:  I’m planning to do about 20,000 of those words by posting essays here, mostly based on a series of dialogues on moral philosophy that I wrote last year for NaNoWriMo which ended up being far too strange to ever be allowed to see the light of day.

So, fair warning.  Follow my blog this month if you like that sort of thing.    I dare say I’ll be bringing in some of the Great Books stuff as well, which I know has been popular here in the past.

 

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NHK’s Miki Yamamoto is an Extraterrestrial

People all over the work tune into NHK World’s Newsline every weekday to listen to the too-cute-to-be-human Miki Yamamoto read the news for “Japan and Around the World.”  But have we ever thought about just what “too cute to be human” means?

nhk-newsline_miki-yamamoto_1920x1080

Too Cute to be Human

That’s right.  She isn’t human.  She is an alien visitor, most likely sent to gather data on Earth’s culture—especially the highest expression of that culture: Japanese public TV—from the inside.

If you don’t believe me, just look at the animation below.  Even with their advanced makeup techniques, including cheek padding, the visitors can’t change the overall proportions of their skulls.

mikimorph

Artist’s Conception of Miki Yamamoto Without her Human Disguise

Ms. Yamamoto most likely relies on a high quality latex mask, human-hair wig, and special contacts applied to the lower portion of her giant black alien eyes.  Given the different size of the visitors’ eyes, she is forced to peer out though what, to her, must seem like pin-holes.  Her occasional difficulties reading the teleprompter lend credence to this interpretation.

Note also Ms. Yamamoto’s apparent lack of aging.   According to data from various internet sources, she should now be in her mid to late 40’s.  Yet she looks exactly the same as she did eleven years ago (minus the pigtails). That is to say she looks about 20 years old.  This discrepancy can easily be explained by the fact that latex masks of the quality Miki Yamamoto requires are hard to come by, so she has been using the same one for some time.

t_yamamoto

Yamamoto Doesn’t Seem to Have Aged Since Starting he TV Career

It is hard to imagine that Ms. Yamamoto’s makeup artist is not in on the secret, since at close range a professional would immediately notice her disguise.  This person is clearly either an alien themselves, or a human agent of aliens. If the former, it would explain some of the questionable lipstick and makeup choices seen on NHK announcers in recent years, since aliens perceive a different color spectrum than we do.  In fact, we should probably consider the possibility that NHK is now completely riddled with alien infiltrators.

I know that these revelations may be shocking for some.  I was shocked myself when I first realized the truth (although my fifth, sixth, and seventh beers helped with the shock).  I knew, though, that I couldn’t live with myself if I didn’t let all of you know.