Category Archives: Breaking News

First (Poison) Fruits of NaNoWriMo

We’re roughly at the halfway point for the NaNoWriMo writing challenge.  I’m a bit behind on word count (only about 11,000 out of 50,000 words), though not critically so.  I’m not too worried because I will go through at least one bipolar cycle between now and the end and on the up cycle I can average 5,000+ words per day.

In my last post I mentioned that, instead of writing a novel, I wanted to write some essays on moral philosophy.  I have a couple of first drafts done, but I don’t want to post them until I’ve rewritten them a couple times.  Have no fear, though, they’re coming.  In the meantime, I do have something that is ready:  The following will be packaged as bonus features for a webcomic that I am creating.  Please imagine that it is contained in multiple tabs on a sidebar under a menu button called “About”.  Have the visual?  Good.

Oh, if you want to see a preview of Poison Fruit, the webcomic, you can click here for the first half-dozen pages.  Keep in mind, though, that this is still early days and I may decide to change things before I go live.


A Little Background

Poison Fruit was meant to be a movie.  Ever since, several years ago now, I first read Webster’s Duchess of Malfi, I have wanted to create an adaptation that would make it accessible to 21st century audiences, while still maintaining the atmosphere and pathos of the original.  If possible, I also wanted it to be set in space. Those were the two things I knew for sure, all of the other details fluctuated as I kept the project on the back burners of my mind.  I considered different media: live action, stop motion, marionettes. Different formats: a feature, an OVA, a streaming television show. Different scopes: would it be just Duchess, or would I bring in material from other Jacobean plays?  I also thought about the world itself. For a year or more I was decided to make all the characters extraterrestrials.  If there were any humans at all, they would be in strictly supporting roles. But as I explored the concept, I realized that if I wanted to make them relatable, I would need to make them fairly human.  And, as much as I love Star Trek, we don’t need any more green-painted women or otherwise human characters with bumpy foreheads.  If I was going to have aliens, I wanted to make them alien, but Poison Fruit is a human story.

Around the time I had a pretty good conception of the project, I realized that I wasn’t going to be able to make it work on video.  To tell the story wanted, I would need, at the minimum, a full season TV show. My production company is, for the most part, a one-man-band operation.  Animated productions typically employee dozens, if not hundreds, of specialists. Even if I could somehow raise the money to hire them all, and find a place for all of them to work, I have neither the experience not the administrative support structure to show-run that size production, which meant I would have to give up a lot of control to someone else.

I was a bit stuck until the webcomic idea occurred to me.  I like to joke that a comic is just an animated movie with an extremely low frame rate.  In a comic, as compared to a movie, I can dispense with all of the animation between keyframes, all of the audio and accompanying lip-sync, and most of the editing.  By going with more of a manga aesthetic I could use simpler backgrounds. By doing it mostly in grayscale I could eliminate most of the color design work and all of the color grading, while significantly simplifying my texture and lighting work.  And besides, the manga is almost always better than the movie, so why not just make the manga?

So there you have Poison Fruit, a movie adaptation of a play expressed as a web comic.  

The Lure of Italy

The period that we think of as the Renaissance was fleeting–sightly less than 200 years, depending on which start and end dates you choose.  Many historians consider it to have begun in the second half of the 1300’s, when Italian literature and art began breaking away from the medieval conventions which had circumscribed them for centuries.  It was winding down by the mid 1500’s, under the influences of the Spanish occupation and the counter-reformation, events which quashed the violence and vice, and the chaos and corruption of Italy at the expense of her creative and economic energy.  Hardly any Englishmen had anything to do with the renaissance, and few of the famous Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrights were even alive when it happened. [There is a line in Neil Gaiman’s Sandman comics that seems apropos, though I am likely quoting it incorrectly: “The renaissance was just a bunch of Italians poncing around that the English didn’t hear about until 100 years later.”]  And yet, Renaissance Italy exercised an incredibly pervasive influence on early modern English popular culture. We know that translations of Italian books, especially the trashy ones like Painter’s Palace of Pleasure, from which Webster adapted Duchess, were Elizabethan best sellers.  In Shakespeare’s comedies references to Italy and her cities can usually be interpreted as “a generically exotic foreign locale”, and he travels there frequently.  While some of his greatest tragedies are set elsewhere, even he can see that Italy is the natural background for Othello’s crimes of passion and betrayal, and Romeo and Juliet’s feuding noble families and semi-accidental double suicide.   By the reign of James I Italy was the preferred setting for the most horrific tragedies: Gothic murder-fests like Webster’s Duchess of Malfi and White Devil, or sordid tales of incest, mental illness, and more murder, like Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore.  These plays must have sold seats, because they kept writing them.   

What exactly was the English’s fascination with Renaissance Italy?  Vernon Lee, in her essay “The Italy of the Elizabethan Dramatists” in her book Euphorion offers some insight:

The crimes of Italy fascinated Englishmen of genius with a fascination even more potent than that which they exercised over the vulgar imagination of mere foppish and swashbuckler lovers of the scandalous and the sensational: they fascinated with the attraction of tragic grandeur, of psychological strangeness, of moral monstrosity, a generation in whom the passionate imagination of the playwright was curiously blent with the metaphysical analysis of the philosopher and the ethical judgement of the Puritan. To these men, ardent and serious even in their profligacy; imaginative and passionate even in their Puritanism, all sucking avidly at this newly found Italian civilization the wickedness of Italy was more than morbidly attractive or morbidly appalling: it was imaginatively and psychologically fascinating.   

Since it is now in the public domain, I have gone ahead and placed a copy of the essay here.  The full book is available from Project Gutenberg.  The author’s thesis is that since both the immorality and grandeur of Renaissance Italy so far surpassed anything to be found in England, the stories of them provided fuel to launch English literature to height never before (and perhaps never since?) attained.  

And so, we have two Italies.  One is the real Italy of the mid 1300’s through mid 1500’s.  We can never know exactly what it was like, since we weren’t there, but history and archaeology can give us a general idea.  The other is the Italy of the early modern English popular imagination, with it’s every crime and aberration sensationalized and blown out of proportion, loaded with casual anachronisms and, for all relevant purposes, eternal.  These two Italies have some character names and geography in common, but they are not in the same world.

And to these two I add a third.  Just as those old Elizabethan and Jacobean writers took their inspiration from the real Italy to create a world for their imagination, I have used the Jacobean Italy to create an Italy in the outer solar system, which I call Poison Fruit.

There, now that I have the really meta part out if the way, I can go into specifics.  That is, I’ll be as specific as I think I can be without dropping spoilers.

 

The World of Poison Fruit

 

History

No one knows who invented space travel.  It must be ancient, though, because spaceships are mentioned in Homer and the Bible.  They were cruder things than modern ships, though; just look at all the trouble that Ulysses and Jonah had.  

Throughout history, great empires have risen, conquering large segments of the solar system.  At its apex the Roman Empire ruled everything from orbit of Mars to the moons of Saturn. Not only did they enlarge existing orbital habitats and build new ones, but it is sometimes even claimed that they had the technology to land on planets and take off again.  No one entirely believes that last part, though, since it is well-known that entering such a large gravity well is simply a flashy way to commit suicide.

Alas, the Empire succumbed to internal stresses and waves of barbarian invaders from the outer system. A dark age began in which most people focused on subsistence, and it was too dangerous and expensive to stray too far from home.  Rome itself, one of the oldest and largest habitats and the seat of the Church, lost much of its population and much of its influence, except within its own immediate vicinity in the asteroid belt. At one point the French even forced the papacy to relocate to Avignon!  Other Italian habitats, or individual cities within habitats, did better, especially those like Venice and Genoa who managed to maintain their fleets and keep up a steady, albeit local, trade.

In recent generations, though, Italy has grown wealthy again.  Her popes, bankers, mercenaries, and merchant princes bring the treasure of all of Christendom to her coffers.  Her artists and engineers are the envy of the system. Granted, there are still threats to this prosperity. The recent conquest of the habitat of Naples by France has shown that the European powers have grown strong enough to be a threat.  Piracy is rife everywhere. The Turks, though humbled by their defeat a few years ago at Lepanto, are still a powerful force. And, worst of all, Italy herself is plagued by constant small wars between individual cities and factions. Lucky is the habitat that doesn’t have at least one war going on between its cities at any given time.  Lucky is the ruler of a city who can keep the local nobles from slaughtering each other in vendettas. Overall, though, things are going well and Italy is once again, for the first time in centuries, the center of the Christian universe.

 

Families and Factions

House Aragon is one of the most powerful royal families in Europe.  Not only do they control a newly unified Spain with recently established colonies in recently explored parts of the system, but the have extensive holdings in the rest of Europe, as well as a marriage connection with the current Holy Roman Emperor.  The head the family is King Ferdinand the Catholic of Spain, but he isn’t in this story. The Aragons in this story are his second cousins, former members of the royal family of Naples, before its conquest by France. Now they are mere vassals of the French viceroy.  Granted, they still control the Duchies of Calabria and Amalfi, as well as a cardinalship in Rome, but these honors hardly compare with the rule of an entire country. They seek to mend their fortunes, remembering better days and more prosperous relatives.

House Orsini is an ancient patrician house of Rome, able to trace their roots to the founding of the city.  At least, that’s what they say. What is known for sure is that since the dark ages Orsini have been involved in Roman politics.  The other thing they are known for is their recurring feuds with House Colonna, another ancient Roman family. What some people have not realized, at least until it was too late, is that the  Orsini and the Colloni are quite capable of joining forces against any third-party that tries to muscle into their turf. Between the two of them they control the majority of the eternal city’s military assets, as well as numerous men in key positions of authority, both secular and religious.  

The senior Orsini are adept at walking the line between suave, cultured nobles and gangster bosses.  Not that they see any conflict between the two. Their current “Prince” is Paolo Orsini, Duke of Bracciano, near Rome.  Besides their seat at Bracciano, a junior branch of the family holds the County of Pitigliano, also near Rome.

House Medici is by far the wealthiest family in Italy, as well as the absolute rulers of the Tuscany Habitat and its capital city, Florence.  The current head of the family is Grand Duke Cosimo di Medici. He was a highly successful condottiere, or mercenary general until the main branch of the family died out and he inherited the throne.  

Rumors of crimes of brutality and lust attach to the Medicis as they have done to no house since the fall of the Borgias, over a generation ago.  Most of these stories seem to have been spread by jealous rivals. On the other hand, it is well-known that Cosimo does what he wants, without reference to the laws of God or man.

 

Technology

Habitats

While smaller habitats exist, built on different patterns, the majority of people in the solar system live in what, in another universe, are called Stanford Toruses.  They are gigantic (tens of thousands of square miles of surface area) doughnut shaped objects that spin to produce artificial gravity. A system of mirrors transmits light more or less evenly onto the surface, while most harmful radiation is absorbed by the outer rim.  The terrain inside every habitat varies, with each having its own combination of coasts, mountains, rivers and other landforms.

No one knows who originally built the habitats.  While the commoners believe it was the Romans, it seems more likely that they just repaired and expanded what was already there.  Whoever the builders were, they believed in massive redundancy, generous factors of safety, and minimizing the number of moving parts—which is probably why so many habitats are still livable.

Space Travel

The microgravity hub area of each major habitat contains vast manufacturing and storage spaces, most of which are only partially explored.  There are probably large areas where no man has entered since ancient times. No one alive knows what most of the equipment does or how to use it.  However, there are certain common items that any spacefarer knows how to recognize and put to use, like life support and thruster modules. The ancients left generous stockpiles of the most common sizes, which can easily be bolted onto contemporary hulls (built of wood, wrought iron, canvas and other mundane materials) to create functional space ships.

One process that has not been lost is the art of making very thin, strong solar sails….though the actual machines and the technique of using them is a closely guarded guild secret.   All ships that sail out of sight of a habitat carry solar sails in addition to thrusters because thrusters are not only expensive, but they sometimes fail and, when they do, no one knows how to repair them.  Also, thrusters burn phlogiston (a.k.a. hydrogen) which, while it is cheap and available at the space port of any habitat, takes up space that could otherwise be used for cargo. For these reasons long-distance freighters and cruisers rely on solar sails for their primary means of propulsion.

Gunpowder

Guns and gunpowder have been around for two and a half centuries, and cannon have long since replaced catapults and ballistas as artillery, both within habitats and in space.  Black powder weapons work in a vacuum as long as a high oxidizer powder is used. “Space powder” is less powerful than that used in atmosphere, but the lack of air resistance makes up for the reduced muzzle velocities at all but the shortest ranges.  

Matchlock arquebuses, though they can be a bit aggravating, are common infantry weapons.  Wheellock weapons are also available and are more reliable and don’t require walking around with a burning match.  However they are also several times as expensive, and never issued to common soldiers. There are also still plenty of bows and crossbows around.  They take more practice to master than guns but they tend to be more accurate and reliable. Also, sailors and marines dislike matchlocks for the simple reason that they live next to large tanks of highly flammable phlogiston.  

 

Further Reading  

Poison Fruit is its own world, with its own history.  For those who would like to know more about the worlds that inspire it, though, the works below are good starting points.  Many of these are available for free download at Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org).

Plays About Italy

The major plot arcs in Poison Fruit are adapted from these plays so, while I recommend them highly, you might want to wait until the manga is done before reading them, to avoid spoilers:

Webster, John. The Duchess of Malfi.

Webster, John. The White Devil.

These three tragedies have a similar atmosphere to the Webster plays and are set in what I think of as the same world.  They were inspirational for Poison Fruit but did not directly affect the plot:

Ford, John.  ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore (a.k.a. Giuliano and Annabella).

Shakespeare, William. Othello.

Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet.

For those who still haven’t had enough, here is a further sampling of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays set in Italy:

Jonson, Ben. Volpone or The Fox.

Marston, John. Antonio and Mellida (Parts I and II).

Marston, John. The Malcontent.

Massinger, Phillip. The Great Duke of Florence.

Massinger, Phillip.  The Maid of Honor.

Shakespeare, William. Much Ado About Nothing.

Shakespeare, William. The Merchant of Venice.

Shakespeare, William. The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

 

Historical Italy

Source Documents

The Palace of Pleasure was one of the most popular sources of story ideas for the playwrights.  It is an anthology of early modern English translations of Italian and French stories, referred to as “novells” (though, by 21st century  standards, most of them are closer to short story length). The plot of Webster’s Duchess of Malfi is taken directly from Volume 3, Novell 23.  While it is purportedly a true story, it’s unlikely that the original author did any fact checking.

Painter, William. (1566). The Palace of Pleasure (3 Volumes).

Stendahl’s book is a translation of an eyewitness account of the events that inspired The White Devil.  Webster himself probably got the story from another (now lost) novell.  

Stendahl. (1837). Vittoria Accoramboni.  

In addition, anyone who really wants to get a feel for the era would do well to read anything by Boccaccio, Dante, and Machiavelli.  Dante and Boccacio wrote at the beginning of, or just before the renaissance and their books remained best sellers right up to the end. Machiavelli wrote at the end of the period.  His books are the quintessential summation of Renaissance thought, right at the turning point into what we think of as the “modern” age. The three most important works are:

Boccaccio, Giovanni. (c. 1350).  The Decameron.

Alighieri, Dante.  (1320). The Divine Comedy.

Machiavelli, Niccolò.  (1532). The Prince.

General Background

There are far too many books on Renaissance Italy and early modern drama for me to try listing them all.  A few that I’ve found particularly useful are:

Durant, Will. (1953). The Renaissance.  Simon and Schuster.

Hill, Wayne F. & Örrchen, Cynthia J. (1991). Shakespeare’s Insults: Educating Your Witt. Mainsail Press.

“The Italy of the Elizabethan Dramatists”. In Lee, Vernon. (1882).  Euphorion (Volume I).

Norway, Arthur H. (1901). Naples, Past and Present.

Staley, Edgcumbe. (1900). The Tragedies of the Medici.

NaNoWriMo: Point of Departure

I haven’t been posting on this blog for a few weeks because:  1) Having broken the story about NHK World’s probable infiltration by space aliens I didn’t want to confuse my message and 2) I’ve been a bit busy with Inktober.  Now, however, Inktober is done, it seems that the government has suppressed my NHK story (else it would have more hits by now) and NaNoWriMo is once again upon us.  Just as I do Inktober my own way, I  have my own take on NaNoWriMo.  Most people try to write the first draft of a single 50,000 word novel.  That’s fine, but the last thing I need right now is another first draft in my editing queue.  So what I did last year—and will again this year—is to just write 50,000 words on any combination of legitimate projects.  Last year it took me three and a half weeks to get there; maybe I’ll go faster this year.

Now some of that will be for books I’m working on currently.  But one of them is the third draft of a novel, and I’ve never figured out a good word-count conversion for rewrites, and the other is a textbook that requires creating numerous figures and examples as I go, so that word-count builds pretty slowly.

So that’s where the blog comes in:  I’m planning to do about 20,000 of those words by posting essays here, mostly based on a series of dialogues on moral philosophy that I wrote last year for NaNoWriMo which ended up being far too strange to ever be allowed to see the light of day.

So, fair warning.  Follow my blog this month if you like that sort of thing.    I dare say I’ll be bringing in some of the Great Books stuff as well, which I know has been popular here in the past.

 

NHK’s Miki Yamamoto is an Extraterrestrial

People all over the work tune into NHK World’s Newsline every weekday to listen to the too-cute-to-be-human Miki Yamamoto read the news for “Japan and Around the World.”  But have we ever thought about just what “too cute to be human” means?

nhk-newsline_miki-yamamoto_1920x1080

Too Cute to be Human

That’s right.  She isn’t human.  She is an alien visitor, most likely sent to gather data on Earth’s culture—especially the highest expression of that culture: Japanese public TV—from the inside.

If you don’t believe me, just look at the animation below.  Even with their advanced makeup techniques, including cheek padding, the visitors can’t change the overall proportions of their skulls.

mikimorph

Artist’s Conception of Miki Yamamoto Without her Human Disguise

Ms. Yamamoto most likely relies on a high quality latex mask, human-hair wig, and special contacts applied to the lower portion of her giant black alien eyes.  Given the different size of the visitors’ eyes, she is forced to peer out though what, to her, must seem like pin-holes.  Her occasional difficulties reading the teleprompter lend credence to this interpretation.

Note also Ms. Yamamoto’s apparent lack of aging.   According to data from various internet sources, she should now be in her mid to late 40’s.  Yet she looks exactly the same as she did eleven years ago (minus the pigtails). That is to say she looks about 20 years old.  This discrepancy can easily be explained by the fact that latex masks of the quality Miki Yamamoto requires are hard to come by, so she has been using the same one for some time.

t_yamamoto

Yamamoto Doesn’t Seem to Have Aged Since Starting he TV Career

It is hard to imagine that Ms. Yamamoto’s makeup artist is not in on the secret, since at close range a professional would immediately notice her disguise.  This person is clearly either an alien themselves, or a human agent of aliens. If the former, it would explain some of the questionable lipstick and makeup choices seen on NHK announcers in recent years, since aliens perceive a different color spectrum than we do.  In fact, we should probably consider the possibility that NHK is now completely riddled with alien infiltrators.

I know that these revelations may be shocking for some.  I was shocked myself when I first realized the truth (although my fifth, sixth, and seventh beers helped with the shock).  I knew, though, that I couldn’t live with myself if I didn’t let all of you know.

Sci-fi Survey Preliminary Results

I have preliminary results from the science fiction readership survey. Cheers to everyone who participated!

You should be able to see Google Form’s summary by going to https://goo.gl/forms/kvzVgZ75h7ZIiUv03

For my fellow quant nerds, I started a repository with the raw data and my preliminary statistical analysis https://github.com/longhunt/sci_fi_survey

Over the next couple weeks I will be figuring out what it all means and writing a report, which I will also post. I did notice a couple of things right away, though:

1) More than half the respondents self identify as librarians. Apparently, librarians like to take surveys about libraries…

2) Series related factors are the most important to the majority of readers. People want to continue reading series they have started or start new series with lots of books available at the library.

3) The respondents cluster rather neatly into two groups, which we can call “Heavy Readers” and “Moderate Readers”. The heavy readers seem to skew female and be more educated–though probably not as much as it seems from the raw data, since we have so many librarians responding (librarians also skew female, and most of them have masters degrees). This seems to agree with the academic literature, such as this article which I found after the survey had already started.

More to come. Thanks again!

New Book out this Month

When it comes to being a King, James VI of Scotland literally wrote the book!

I didn’t just write the interpretive front matter and footnotes for this edition, I ended up directing the trailer too. I hope you’ll check it out.

The paperback is already available through Amazon. An ebook should be along by the end of the summer.

How do you choose which books to read?

Hello all, I’ve been volunteering at my local library, trying to help them improve their sci-fi collection (their acquisitions have been pretty random in recent years). As one aspect of the project we came up with a short survey, which I hope you will take, about what factors are important when people check out speculative fiction books.

The survey can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/dFl7IiSmWgyLstQL2

It only takes about 5 minutes and all questions are optional. The survey will stay open until at least the end of May 2018.

ps. Please note that this is a non-profit project in cooperation with a public library.   I’ll release the results in a few weeks and post a link here.

 

Automatic Indexing of LaTex Documents

A couple weeks ago I mentioned in a post that I was working on a Python script to automatically generate indexes of books written in the LaTex typesetting system.  At the time I promised to post the script in “a couple of days”.  Predictably, weeks have passed, my little script has ballooned into a full on open-source software project, and the code is now too long to post (or explain) in a single blog article.  If you’re interested, however, you can now download my alpha release from sourceforge.

The package includes two Python programs.  Indexmeister is a console utility which reads a file (in several formats, not just LaTex) and suggests terms for indexing.  It uses three different methods to figure out which terms are important.  Imbrowse is a Curses program which helps you interactively browse multi-file LaTex books and quickly insert the right tags to generate an index.

I made this video tutorial to show how the system works:

In the future I am thinking of adding a plug-in for LibreOffice, and possibly a graphical interface (probably using GTK bindings). Porting it to Windoze is not a priority, however.

Handyman Kevin Series II Premier

I rarely post updates here for my YouTube show, Handyman Kevin–mainly because it has its own dedicated blog. I thought I should mention, however, that the first episode of my second season premiered a few minutes ago:

 

The first season focused mainly on general Handyman skills. This season will have more of a focus on workshop tools and techniques. As before, we are planning to release thirteen fifteen to twenty-five minute episodes, each with an accompanying blog post.

Off to Grad School Again: The Second Essay

The other day I posted the first of the essays I had to write for my application to CSUDH’s Humanities Master of Arts External (HUX) program. As promised, here is the second, longer essay. The prompt asked me to describe two to three events, works, or people which inspired my interest in the humanities. I chose to write about two professors I worked under as a teaching assistant the last time I was in graduate school who made particularly effective use of the Great Books in their courses.

Two professors, Dr. Sean Jasso and Dr. Paul Beehler, did more to inspire my interest in studying and teaching the humanities than anyone else I have met. Ironically, I met both of them not by taking humanities courses, but by being assigned as their teaching assistant in business school. Each of them, however, is serious about integrating the humanities in their undergraduate business classes and expects their assistants to do the same. While working for them I learned more about writing, criticism, and the great authors of the Western canon than I did in my entire undergraduate career.

Dr. Sean Jasso’s background is in hospitality management but his research is in public policy and corporate ethics. For several years he has been fine-tuning a class titled “Business Ethics and Law in Society”. The main text for the course is Michael Sandel’s Justice, which uses real world examples to illustrate the ideas of ethical philosophers such as Aristotle, Kant, Rawls, and Mill. All of these authors were new to me. I nearly panicked the first time a student appeared in my office saying that she “didn’t really understand Kant’s theory of categorical imperatives,” and could I explain it for her. As every teacher knows, however, teaching a subject is the best way to understand it. My own pedagogical style relies heavily on Socratic questions to encourage students to think critically and make connections, so my weekly discussion sections became a shared journey of inquiry with my students as we found new ways to apply the teachings of these philosophers to weekly case studies.

With Dr. Jasso’s help, I soon found ways to apply the philosophy we were teaching to situations in my professional life. One ethical issue that affects everyone in higher education is academic integrity. Catching a student cheating or plagiarizing creates an ethical dilemma for any teacher teacher, especially an overworked graduate assistant. To simply ignore the offense and pass the student is easy, but is a betrayal of one’s duty and, in utilitarian terms, hurts the whole society by lessening the value of a university education for all students. Failing the offender and turning them over for disciplinary action is nearly as easy and can be justified on the grounds that cheating is categorically wrong and that punishing cheaters rewards those students who do not offend. Dr. Jasso believes, however, that because a teacher’s purpose is to educate, a cheating incident needs to be used as an additional opportunity to teach the student. He expects his assistants to call a meeting the student and himself. In this meeting teaching assistant confronts the student, who is given an opportunity to confess. Students who come clean are then prompted to explain why their actions were wrong and allowed to write an essay titled “Why Cheating is Wrong and I Won’t do it Again”, supporting their points with material from the class. If the teaching assistant is satisfied with the essay then they are not referred for disciplinary action (they still have to repeat the course). These “cheater meetings” were emotionally exhausting for the teaching assistant and created extra grading work, but Dr. Jasso convinced me that they were the right thing to do.

Dr. Paul Beehler is an English professor who teaches “Business Writing and Communications” for the School of Business Administration. One of the texts for his course is Machiavelli’s The Prince. As their term project students are required to write a research paper analyzing the strategy of a real corporation in terms of Machiavellian philosophy. When grading papers and exam blue books I found that I usually knew within a few paragraphs whether I was looking at ‘B’ or ‘C’ work (there were very few ‘A’s), but a letter grade is almost useless to a student because it doesn’t tell them what they are doing right and wrong. Dr. Beehler pushed me to become not only an editor, but a critic: deconstructing a student’s work and offering comments on their style, logical reasoning, creativity, and use of semiotics. This was a painful process for me, because Dr. Beehler spot checks his assistants’ grading work and often returns papers to be regraded. I was frequently frustrated when his opinion of a paper differed widely from my own. As time went on, however, I realized that my criticism tended to be fairly shallow and he was teaching me to read at a deeper level– to go beyond mechanics and rhetorical flourishes and assess the sophistication of a student’s thoughts. I soon I realized that I was applying a deeper level of analysis to everything I read, including my own work. I was also able to give much better comments to students who brought in their work in progress to show me during office hours. This made me a better critic and editor which in turn made me a better writer.

Another benefit of teaching the class under Dr. Beehler is that it introduced me to Machiavelli’s work, which I now understand represents a watershed in Western philosophy. Machiavelli stands upon the divide between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment and represents one of the first articulations of the basically humanistic path which Western thought has followed for the past five centuries. His decision to embrace republican political philosophy over the traditional divine right of kings not only influenced all of the enlightenment authors who followed him, but eventually led the way to the liberal democracies in which we now live.

Even though I never took a course of theirs, nor did research under them, Dr. Jasso and Dr. Beehler taught me more than any of the professors I knew in professional school. Dr. Jasso introduced me to the great ethical philosophers and showed me how to integrate their theories into my professional life. Dr. Beehler pushed me to a higher level of writing and textual criticism, making me a better writer. Both inspired what I suspect will be a lifelong interest in the Western canon and the humanities in general, and teaching under them was one of the most valuable aspects of my professional school experience.

Off to Grad School Again

The past year and a half of focusing entirely on my writing has been intensely rewarding, but it’s time to start thinking about my formal education again. This morning I took the first steps in applying to CSUDH’s External MA in Humanities (HUX) program. The program seems flexible yet rigorous and I expect to write a thesis which will form the first draft of a future book.

So, fingers crossed and let’s hope that they will admit a business school guy/hack sci-fi writer like me.

One section of the CSU application asks for a personal statement describing my reasons “for pursuing graduate or postbaccalaureate study.” After looking at my statement I realized that it is pertinent to this blog, particularly my ongoing Great Books project, so I decided to post it here:

    During the first half of my career I mainly saw education as a process of training in skills. I earned three business degrees, took years of engineering coursework, and completed several professional certifications–learning how to do many useful things. As time went on, however, I became aware of what I was missing. True education, as distinct from mere training, should be general and liberal. The vocational degrees and training programs I completed did little to teach me about the culture, history, and language of the society in which I live. All the knowledge I acquired was specific and targeted at getting and succeeding in specific jobs. It did not address larger more general questions of the human condition.

 
As I entered my thirties and began spending an increased portion of my time writing, the gaps in my knowledge were made obvious, especially in the areas of literature, history, and philosophy. In order to function, a writer needs to be able to draw from a broad and deep background of cultural knowledge. But my background was unbalanced and primarily technical. To address the problem, I then spent several years deliberately expanding my reading, especially of the so-called “great books” of the Western Cannon. I was aware from the beginning that this would be a poor substitute for a true liberal education. Autodidacticism, however personally rewarding, is inefficient. I know I can learn about the humanities much more effectively if I have teachers and a program with structure.

 
I am now ready, both financially and intellectually, to dedicate two years of my life to the full time study of the humanities. The external MA program at CSUDH is ideal, both because of the content and because I have always done well with distance learning in the past.

The second stage of the application, which goes to the department itself, requires a longer analytical essay which I will probably also post in a few days when I am finished writing it.